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Attend our Free Webinar on How to Nail Your Next Technical Interview

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How To Nail Your Next Tech Interview

Hosted By
Ryan Valles
Founder, Interview Kickstart
Our tried & tested strategy for cracking interviews
How FAANG hiring process works
The 4 areas you must prepare for
How you can accelerate your learnings

Permissions in Linux

Attend our Free Webinar on How to Nail Your Next Technical Interview

WEBINAR +LIVE Q&A

How To Nail Your Next Tech Interview

Hosted By
Ryan Valles
Founder, Interview Kickstart
Our tried & tested strategy for cracking interviews
How FAANG hiring process works
The 4 areas you must prepare for
How you can accelerate your learnings

Permissions in Linux

# Permissions in Linux Linux is a multi-user operating system, meaning that multiple users can have access to the same system at the same time. To make sure that each user's files, programs and processes are protected, Linux utilizes a system of permissions and ownership. Permissions and ownership help to ensure that only the user who owns them can access or modify their files, programs and processes. The permission system in Linux is based on users, groups, and files. Users are the individual accounts that are created on the system. Groups are collections of users with similar access needs. Files are the data that the users store on the system. Each file has an owner, a group, and a set of permissions associated with it. Permissions in Linux can be broken down into three categories: read, write and execute. Read permissions allow the user to view the contents of a file. Write permissions allow the user to modify the contents of a file. Execute permissions allow the user to run programs. In Linux, permissions can be assigned to a user, group, or all users on the system. In addition to basic permissions, Linux also assigns ownership to files. The owner of a file is the user who created it and has full control over its permissions. The group associated with a file is the group that the user belongs to, and the group has some control over the permissions of the file. In Linux, permissions and ownership are essential for protecting data and resources. By assigning different levels of permissions to different users and groups, the operating system can ensure that only the user or group that owns the file can access or modify it. This helps to ensure the security of the system, as it prevents malicious users from accessing or modifying files that they do not own.

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## Algorithm for Permissions in Linux Permissions in Linux are managed through access control lists (ACLs). These ACLs define what users and groups can do with files and directories. The permissions are divided into three categories: 1. Read (r): Allows users to view the contents of a file or directory 2. Write (w): Allows users to modify the contents of a file or directory 3. Execute (x): Allows users to run programs or scripts The permissions are represented by the letters r, w, and x. By combining these letters in various combinations, users can specify exactly what actions are allowed for a particular file or directory. ### Sample Code The following code is an example of setting permissions for a file in Linux: ``` chmod 600 my_file.txt ``` This command sets the permissions for the file `my_file.txt` to `600`, which gives the owner of the file read and write access (`rw`). No other users or groups have any access to the file.